Cholesterol Articles A-Z

HDL Raising Foods - Lescol Medication

This page contains links to eMedTV Cholesterol Articles containing information on subjects from HDL Raising Foods to Lescol Medication. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • HDL Raising Foods
    At this point, researchers haven't identified any HDL raising foods. This segment of the eMedTV library provides detailed information about foods such as fatty fish, walnuts, and garlic that may improve heart health even if they don't increase HDL.
  • HDL/LDL Ratio
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, the HDL/LDL ratio is the proportion of "good cholesterol" (HDL) to "bad cholesterol" (LDL). This article explains how this ratio is figured and explains how it compares to other cholesterol numbers.
  • Health Effects of Cholesterol
    Health effects of cholesterol problems include angina, stroke, and heart attack. This segment of the eMedTV Web site provides detailed information on these and other serious health problems associated with high cholesterol.
  • Healthy Cholesterol Levels
    When determining healthy cholesterol levels, it's important to consider LDL and HDL. As this eMedTV segment explains, total cholesterol levels can be misleading. This page talks about good cholesterol levels and offers easy-to-understand tables.
  • High Chlosterol
    Having uncontrolled high cholesterol can lead to health problems. As this eMedTV resource explains, however, cholesterol can be controlled through lifestyle changes and other options. High chlosterol is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Chlosterol Diet
    Those with high cholesterol are encouraged to cut back on animal products and eat more plant-based foods. This eMedTV page explains how changing your diet can reduce cholesterol. High chlosterol diet is a common misspelling of high cholesterol diet.
  • High Cholesteral
    The causes of high cholesterol are unknown; however, as this eMedTV page explains, we do know that the condition can lead to serious health problems, including heart disease and stroke. High cholesteral is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Cholesteral Diet
    This eMedTV page discusses how a high cholesterol diet can raise blood cholesterol and outlines the criteria for a low cholesterol diet (including limited salt and fat intake). High cholesteral diet is a common misspelling of high cholesterol diet.
  • High Cholesterol
    Effects of high cholesterol due to atherosclerosis include angina, heart attack, and stroke. This eMedTV Web page highlights these and other health risks associated with this condition and also explains treatment options.
  • High Cholesterol and Blocked Blood Vessels
    High cholesterol levels in the blood cause problems over many years. Excess cholesterol can build up on your artery walls, along with other fats and debris. This buildup can narrow or even block the blood vessels.
  • High Cholesterol and Your LDL and HDL Numbers
    Your doctor will look at three numbers when he or she checks your cholesterol levels: your total cholesterol, your HDL and LDL. Your HDL is good cholesterol, your LDL is bad cholesterol.
  • High Cholesterol Diet
    This section of the eMedTV library provides tips for moving from a high cholesterol diet to a healthier eating plan. Keys to lowering cholesterol in your diet include limiting your saturated fat intake and increasing consumption of plant-based foods.
  • High Cholesterol Foods
    Animal products, such as organ meat, eggs, cheese, and whole milk, are high cholesterol foods. This eMedTV page provides other examples of this type of food, and also discusses plant-based foods containing saturated fat and trans fat.
  • High Cholesterol Presentation Summary
    This video gives a summary of high cholesterol and stresses the importance of making cholesterol control a life-long commitment.
  • High Cholesterol Risk
    Lowering your risk of high cholesterol involves lowering your low-density lipoprotein (LDL) level. This eMedTV article explains how cholesterol goals may vary for people based on factors such as family history and nicotine use.
  • High Cholesterol Symptoms
    There may be no apparent high cholesterol symptoms, but the effects of the condition can be serious. This eMedTV segment explains how high cholesterol can lead to problems like stroke and heart disease while causing no symptoms.
  • High Cholestoral
    Age, weight, and diet are factors that affect a person's risk of developing high cholesterol. This eMedTV segment lists other risk factors and describes the effects of high cholesterol. High cholestoral is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Cholestorol
    High cholesterol can eventually lead to stroke, angina, or arrhythmias. This eMedTV page describes other effects of this condition and explains how to maintain healthy cholesterol levels. High cholestorol is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Cholestral
    This eMedTV page offers an overview of high cholesterol, a condition that can cause health problems (such as heart disease and strokes). This page also covers testing for high cholesterol. High cholestral is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Cholestral Foods
    This eMedTV page explains that high cholesterol foods include meat, egg yolks, butter, and cheese. This page also describes various types of fats that can affect your cholesterol. High cholestral foods is a common misspelling of high cholesterol foods.
  • High Cholestrol
    This eMedTV article offers a brief overview of high cholesterol, a condition that can cause heart disease and strokes. This page also explains how to determine if you have high cholesterol. High cholestrol is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Cholestrol Diets
    A change in diet can help to lower cholesterol. This page from the eMedTV Web site explains how eating more plant-based foods and less animal-based foods can lower cholesterol. High cholestrol diets is a common misspelling of high cholesterol diet.
  • High Cholestrol Foods
    Some of the common high cholesterol foods are butter, egg yolks, and meat. This eMedTV page lists other high cholesterol foods and provides a link to more information. High cholestrol foods is a common misspelling of high cholesterol foods.
  • High Cholosterol
    High cholesterol can lead to health conditions such as heart disease, angina, and strokes. This eMedTV page explains what high cholesterol is and how often to check your cholesterol levels. High cholosterol is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Colesteral
    Your body needs cholesterol to function properly. However, as this eMedTV article explains, high cholesterol levels can put you at risk of health problems (such as heart disease). High colesteral is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Colesterol
    High cholesterol is a condition that can lead to health problems such as coronary heart disease and stroke. This eMedTV resource offers a brief look at the condition and its risk factors. High colesterol is a common misspelling of high cholesterol.
  • High Colesterol Diet
    This eMedTV Web page explains that as part of moving away from a high cholesterol diet, you should eat at least three to five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. High colesterol diet is a common misspelling of high cholesterol diet.
  • High Colesterol Foods
    Some high cholesterol foods include butter, cheese, and duck. This eMedTV Web page also lists foods that aren't high in cholesterol but are still bad for cholesterol levels. High colesterol foods is a common misspelling of high cholesterol foods.
  • High HDL
    According to the latest guidelines, HDL levels of 60 mg/dL and above are considered high. This page of the eMedTV library highlights the benefits of having high HDL cholesterol levels and offers an explanation of possible causes.
  • High Triglicerides
    As this eMedTV resource explains, high triglycerides occur in about 10 percent of people. This article also takes a closer look at why high triglycerides can be so dangerous. High triglicerides is a common misspelling of high triglycerides.
  • High Triglicerides Low Cholesteral
    High triglycerides occur in 10 percent of people. This eMedTV page explains what triglycerides are used for and explores the causes of high triglycerides. High triglicerides low cholesterol is a common variation and misspelling of high triglycerides.
  • High Triglyceride Symptoms
    There are no high triglyceride signs and symptoms, as this eMedTV article explains. However, the effects of high triglycerides over long periods of time can be life-threatening. For example, they can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.
  • High Triglycerides
    High levels of triglycerides can lead to health problems such as heart disease and heart attack. This eMedTV resource explains what triglycerides are, what causes levels to become high, possible symptoms, treatment options, and more.
  • High Trygliceride Cause
    This eMedTV page explains that being overweight, excessive alcohol, and inadequate fasting before a blood test are common causes of high triglycerides. High trygliceride cause is a common misspelling and variation of causes of high triglycerides.
  • High Tryglicerides
    Obesity and lack of physical activity are some of the factors associated with high triglyceride levels. This eMedTV segment gives a brief overview of high triglycerides. High tryglicerides is a common misspelling of high triglycerides.
  • High Tryglycerides
    About 1 in 10 people has high triglycerides. As this eMedTV page explains, high triglyceride levels can cause heart disease and other problems. This page also links to more information. High tryglycerides is a common misspelling of high triglycerides.
  • Home Cholesterol Test
    A home cholesterol test can be about as accurate as the test your doctor uses. However, as this eMedTV page explains, you must follow the directions carefully. This article talks about the benefits and limitations of this type of test.
  • How Do Statins Work?
    As this eMedTV page explains, statins work to lower cholesterol by controlling the rate of cholesterol production in the body. This page includes detail on how statins can prevent heart disease and offers a link to more in-depth information.
  • How Do You Get High Cholesterol?
    Many people have asked, "How do you get high cholesterol?" This portion of the eMedTV archives provides detailed information about how certain risk factors (such as diet, weight, and age) increase the likelihood of having high cholesterol.
  • How Does High Cholesterol Affect My Life?
    This video clip answers the question: "How Does High Cholesterol Affect My Life?"
  • How Is High Cholesterol Diagnosed?
    This video discuses cholesterol numbers and how high cholesterol is diagnosed.
  • How Is High Cholesterol Treated?
    How is high cholesterol treated? This multimedia clip gives an overview of treatment options for high cholesterol.
  • How to Lower Cholesteral
    High cholesterol can cause problems, such as heart disease, a heart attack, or strokes. This eMedTV page gives an overview of lowering your cholesterol in a couple of ways. How to lower cholesteral is a common misspelling of how to lower cholesterol.
  • How to Lower Cholestrol
    This page of the eMedTV Web library explains how lifestyle changes and medications can help to lower cholesterol. This page also offers a link to more information. How to lower cholestrol is a common misspelling of how to lower cholesterol.
  • How to Lower Colesterol
    The first step in lowering cholesterol is making lifestyle changes. This eMedTV article lists some of these lifestyle changes, as well as drugs that may be tried. How to lower colesterol is a common variation and misspelling of lowering cholesterol.
  • How to Lower Trigliceride
    This eMedTV page provides a brief explanation of how to lower triglycerides, such as through lifestyle changes and medications. This page also links to more information. How to lower trigliceride is a common misspelling of how to lower triglycerides.
  • How to Lower Triglicerides
    Dietary changes and weight loss are often recommended for lowering triglyceride levels. This eMedTV page offers more information on lowering triglycerides. How to lower triglicerides is a common misspelling and variation of lowering triglycerides.
  • How to Lower Trigliserides
    This eMedTV article explains how to lower triglycerides through lifestyle changes. Controlling your other medical conditions is another step in lowering triglycerides. How to lower trigliserides is a common misspelling of how to lower triglycerides.
  • How to Lower Triglycerides
    This eMedTV Web page explains how to lower triglycerides by making lifestyle changes (such as losing weight), getting treatment for conditions that may elevate triglycerides (such as diabetes), and taking certain medications (such as fibrates).
  • How to Lower Tryglycerides
    If you have high triglycerides, it's important to get them under control. This eMedTV page explains how to lower triglycerides and lists lifestyle changes you can make. How to lower tryglycerides is a common misspelling of how to lower triglycerides.
  • How to Raise HDL Cholesteral
    Lifestyle changes and certain medications can help raise HDL cholesterol levels. This eMedTV resource further discusses ways of increasing HDL levels. How to raise HDL cholesteral is a common misspelling and variation of how to raise HDL cholesterol.
  • Ideal Cholesterol Reading
    Your ideal cholesterol reading will vary based on the number of risk factors you have for heart disease. This eMedTV Web page outlines the guidelines used to determine desirable cholesterol readings through easy-to-read tables.
  • Increase HDL
    Efforts to increase HDL usually involve losing weight, exercising more, and quitting smoking. This page of the eMedTV Web site also discusses ways to achieve this through additional lifestyle changes and/or medication.
  • Information About Simcor
    Simcor is a medication that is available by prescription to treat high cholesterol or triglycerides. This eMedTV page provides more information about Simcor, including details on the drug's effects and a list of potential side effects of the medicine.
  • Information on High Cholesterol
    Having high cholesterol can increase your risk of angina, heart attacks, and other problems. This eMedTV page offers a brief description of high cholesterol, with information on treatment options and risk factors. A link to more details is also included.
  • Introduction to High Cholesterol
    This multimedia clip offers an introduction to high cholesterol.
  • Is It Possible for Children to Have High Cholesterol?
    High cholesterol can occur in children as well as adults; however, as this eMedTV resource explains, what is considered a "normal" cholesterol level will vary from child to child, and will depend on things like risk factors and family history.
  • Is Policosanol Safe?
    There are many policosanol safety precautions and warnings to be aware of before taking the supplement. This eMedTV page examines these safety concerns, including who should not use policosanol and what your doctor should know beforehand.
  • Juvisync
    Available by prescription, Juvisync is a drug used to lower cholesterol in people with type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page presents an overview of this combination medicine, including how it works, general dosing guidelines, safety precautions, and more.
  • Juvisync and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Juvisync (sitagliptin/simvastatin) passes through human breast milk. This page of the eMedTV Web site discusses whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use Juvisync and explains what the manufacturer of the drug recommends.
  • Juvisync and Liver Damage
    As this eMedTV page explains, vomiting and dark urine may be signs of liver problems that can occur with Juvisync (sitagliptin/simvastatin). This page describes how this drug can increase your risk for liver damage and how to prevent these problems.
  • Juvisync and Muscle Pain
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, taking Juvisync (sitagliptin/simvastatin) can cause muscle pain in some people. This article explains when this reaction may be a sign of a dangerous and even fatal complication, and how your doctor may treat it.
  • Juvisync and Pregnancy
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, Juvisync is a pregnancy Category X medication, which means it should not be taken during pregnancy. This article further explores this topic, and describes the possible problems this drug may cause.
  • Juvisync Dosage
    As explained in this eMedTV article, dosing guidelines for Juvisync will vary, depending on other medicines you are taking and your cholesterol goal. This page also lists some important tips on what to expect during treatment with this combination drug.
  • Juvisync Drug Interactions
    It may not be safe to combine Juvisync with products like warfarin, antibiotics, or antifungals. This eMedTV segment offers a detailed list of drugs that may cause interactions with Juvisync and describes the potentially dangerous problems that may occur.
  • Juvisync Medication Information
    If you have type 2 diabetes and high cholesterol, you may benefit from Juvisync. This eMedTV Web page presents more information on Juvisync, including how the medication works and who should not take it.
  • Juvisync Overdose
    Seek immediate medical care if you have taken too much Juvisync (sitagliptin/simvastatin). This eMedTV resource describes possible problems this combination medication may cause and examines some possible treatment options that are available.
  • Juvisync Side Effects
    A runny nose and abdominal (stomach) pain are among the most commonly reported Juvisync side effects. This eMedTV resource offers a detailed list of other reactions this medicine might cause and explains which problems require medical attention.
  • Juvisync Uses
    Juvisync is prescribed to lower cholesterol levels in adults who have type 2 diabetes. This eMedTV page examines what Juvisync is used for, including how this combination medicine works and whether there are unapproved reasons to take it.
  • Juvisync Warnings and Precautions
    If you have active liver disease or if you are pregnant, you should not take Juvisync. This eMedTV page lists some of the safety warnings and precautions you should be aware of with Juvisync, including those relating to serious complications.
  • Kaduet
    Caduet is a drug used to treat conditions affecting the heart and blood vessels. This eMedTV segment covers how Caduet works, describes its effects, and explains what to tell your doctor before using the drug. Kaduet is a common misspelling of Caduet.
  • Lavastatin
    Lovastatin is a medication used to treat high cholesterol. This eMedTV article further explains what lovastatin is used for and lists conditions you should tell your doctor about before using the drug. Lavastatin is a common misspelling of lovastatin.
  • Lavaza
    Lovaza is a prescription medication used for treating very high triglycerides. This eMedTV Web page describes Lovaza in more detail and explains why it may be safer than over-the-counter fish oil supplements. Lavaza is a common misspelling of Lovaza.
  • LDL
    LDL, also known as "bad" cholesterol, is a substance used to transport cholesterol throughout the body. This eMedTV page explains how too much of this cholesterol in the blood can build up on artery walls and lead to problems, like a heart attack.
  • LDL Bad Cholesteral
    This eMedTV segment explores LDL cholesterol (or "bad cholesterol"). As this article explains, people with higher LDL levels are at greater risk for heart disease. LDL bad cholesteral is a common misspelling and variation of LDL cholesterol.
  • LDL Cholesterol
    As explained in this eMedTV article, LDL cholesterol (also known as "bad cholesterol") is another name for low density lipoprotein, a substance used to transport cholesterol in the body. Too much of it can increase the risk for heart disease.
  • LDL Cholestoral
    LDL is considered "bad" cholesterol because it can cause plaque buildup in the arteries. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief description of LDL, as well as a link to more information. LDL cholestoral is a common misspelling of LDL cholesterol.
  • Lescol
    Lescol is a prescription medication commonly used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV segment offers an in-depth look at this drug and its uses, possible side effects, and dosages, with links to additional information.
  • Lescol Alternatives
    This eMedTV page offers a list of Lescol alternatives, which may include other cholesterol medicines or statins. Besides statins, other classes of cholesterol drugs include fibrates, bile acid sequestrants, and cholesterol absorption inhibitors.
  • Lescol and Breastfeeding
    Studies have shown that Lescol passes through breast milk in humans in significant amounts. This eMedTV resource offers more information on Lescol and breastfeeding, and explores the theoretical risks to a nursing infant who is exposed to the drug.
  • Lescol and Depression
    There may be a slight correlation between Lescol and depression. This eMedTV article takes a look at some of the common symptoms of depression and also explains the importance of talking to your healthcare provider if they occur.
  • Lescol and Joint Pain
    This eMedTV page takes a look at Lescol and joint pain, including information on at-home remedies (such as hot or cold therapy) that can help minimize joint pain. In clinical studies, arthritis occurred in up to 2.1 percent of people taking Lescol.
  • Lescol and Liver Problems
    Up to 5 percent of people taking Lescol experience an increase in liver enzymes. This eMedTV resource offers detailed information on Lescol and liver problems, such as hepatitis, jaundice, cirrhosis, and hepatoma.
  • Lescol and Memory Loss
    Memory loss is not a commonly reported side effect of Lescol. As this eMedTV article explains, it may not even be a side effect at all. This page covers the research that has been done on finding a possible link between Lescol and memory loss.
  • Lescol and Muscle Pain
    In clinical studies, muscle pain was reported as a Lescol side effect in up to 5 percent of patients. This eMedTV page offers an overview of Lescol and muscle pain, including information on serious symptoms to be aware of, such as muscle pain.
  • Lescol and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Lescol may cause harm to an unborn child, so it is not recommended for pregnant women. This page discusses about Lescol and pregnancy, and also explains why the drug is considered a pregnancy Category X medication.
  • Lescol and Weight Gain
    As this eMedTV segment explains, weight gain is not a recognized side effect of Lescol, although it has been reported with other cholesterol medications. This article provides an overview of Lescol and weight gain, with suggestions for weight loss.
  • Lescol Dosage
    For people treating high cholesterol with Lescol, dosage suggestions start at 40 mg or 80 mg daily. This eMedTV segment contains general dosing guidelines and offers tips and warnings for those taking this prescription medication.
  • Lescol Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV resource provides a list of drugs that may potentially interact with Lescol, such as digoxin, niacin, and warfarin. Among other things, Lescol drug interactions may increase your risk for developing serious side effects or muscle problems.
  • Lescol Medication
    This page of the eMedTV Web site presents a brief overview of Lescol, a medication used in the treatment of high triglycerides and high cholesterol. It covers dosing guidelines and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
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