Cholesterol Articles A-Z

Dosing With Lovastatin - HDL Cholesterol

This page contains links to eMedTV Cholesterol Articles containing information on subjects from Dosing With Lovastatin to HDL Cholesterol. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Dosing With Lovastatin
    Adults typically start with a lovastatin dose of 20 mg; 10 mg to 20 mg is recommended for children. As this eMedTV page explains, depending on whether cholesterol goals are reached or if side effects occur, dosing can be adjusted accordingly.
  • Drug Interactions With Cholestyramine
    This eMedTV page lists medicines that may cause drug interactions with Cholestyramine, such as phenobarbital, ursodiol, and warfarin. The mixture of drugs may bind to the intestines, preventing them from fully absorbing into the body.
  • Drug Interactions With Fenofibrate
    This eMedTV page contains a list of medicines that can cause adverse drug interactions with fenofibrate. When these drugs are taken with fenofibrate, serious side effects can occur, including increased risk of kidney and muscle problems or bleeding.
  • Drug Interactions With Lovastatin
    Some of the drugs that can interact with lovastatin include danazol, niacin, and fibrates. As this eMedTV page explains, some of the drug interactions with lovastatin can cause severe side effects and complications, including serious muscle problems.
  • Effects of High Cholesterol
    The effects of high cholesterol due to atherosclerosis include angina, coronary heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. This eMedTV Web page provides detailed information about these and other life-threatening effects of high cholesterol.
  • Examples of Statins
    Some examples of statins include Lipitor, Simcor, and Zocor. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at other types of statins, including a list of brand name and combination medications. Links to more detailed information on these drugs are also included.
  • Exercise and Cholesterol
    As this eMedTV segment explains, activities such as gardening and playing sports not only lower LDL cholesterol, they also raise HDL cholesterol ("good cholesterol"). This article takes an in-depth look at cholesterol and exercise.
  • Fenofibrat
    Fenofibrate is used to decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the body. This selection from the eMedTV library gives a brief overview of the drug and provides a link to more information. Fenofibrat is a common misspelling of fenofibrate.
  • Fenofibrate
    Fenofibrate is a prescription drug used to help decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the body. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at the drug, including information on its uses, effects, general dosing guidelines, and more.
  • Fenofibrate Alternatives
    This eMedTV page offers a list of fenofibrate alternatives, such as other cholesterol drugs or other fibrates. Other classes of cholesterol drugs include such things as bile acid sequestrants, statins, niacin, and cholesterol absorption inhibitors.
  • Fenofibrate Dosing
    Fenofibrate dosing varies, depending on the brand of medicine and the condition being treated. This eMedTV page lists other factors that determine a fenofibrate dose, such as your age, other medical conditions you have, and medicines you are taking.
  • Fenofibrates
    As this eMedTV article explains, fenofibrate (part of the drug class known as fibrates) is a medication used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This Web page takes a quick look at this topic and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Finofibrate
    Fenofibrate is used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This portion of the eMedTV library briefly discusses this drug and how it works and also provides a link to more information. Finofibrate is a common misspelling of fenofibrate.
  • Fish Oil to Increase HDL
    Despite the many benefits associated with it, using fish oil to increase HDL is not effective. This eMedTV resource discusses the benefits that fish oil does offer and includes tips on how you can increase HDL levels through lifestyle changes.
  • Flax Seed
    Flaxseed, which is commonly found in baked goods, can be used to lower cholesterol. This eMedTV article covers other benefits of Flaxseed and explains what to tell your doctor before using the product. Flax seed is a common misspelling of flaxseed.
  • Flaxeed
    Flaxseed is claimed to provide several different benefits, which this eMedTV article describes. Forms in which flaxseed is available and a few side effects to be aware of are also included. Flaxeed is a common misspelling of flaxseed.
  • Flaxseed
    Flaxseed is a natural product that is used to lower cholesterol and relieve constipation. This eMedTV article explores other uses for this product, explains why it may provide health benefits, and discusses the safety and effectiveness of flaxseed.
  • Flaxseed and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women should have no problems taking normal amounts of flaxseed. This eMedTV page provides more information on flaxseed and breastfeeding, and explains why high levels of flaxseed can reduce the quantity and quality of breast milk.
  • Flaxseed and Pregnancy
    For most pregnant women, flaxseed is probably safe, especially when consumed in normal dietary amounts. This eMedTV segment offers more information on this topic, and explains why consuming large amounts of flaxseed could be dangerous.
  • Flaxseed Dietary Supplement
    If you are constipated, you may have heard about using flaxseed as a natural remedy. This eMedTV segment explores the many uses for this dietary supplement, with information on possible side effects. A link to more information is also included.
  • Flaxseed Dosage
    Instead of sticking to a "flaxseed dosage," you may find it easier to just include flaxseed in your diet. This eMedTV page explains how flaxseed can be incorporated into foods and drinks, and offers some precautions for taking this product.
  • Flaxseed Drug Interactions
    Medicines that may cause flaxseed drug interactions include NSAIDs, aspirin, and warfarin. This eMedTV Web page explains why it is important to take oral medications a few hours apart from flaxseed and lists other drugs that may cause an interaction.
  • Flaxseed Overdose
    A flaxseed overdose may cause upset stomach, bloating, and diarrhea. As this eMedTV resource explains, these effects are due to the high fiber content in flaxseed. Potentially dangerous effects of a flaxseed overdose are also listed in this article.
  • Flaxseed Safety
    Make sure to take flaxseed with plenty of water. This part of the eMedTV library contains a list of other important flaxseed safety warnings and precautions, and explains how flaxseed may cause problems in people with certain medical conditions.
  • Flaxseed Side Affects
    Potential flaxseed side effects include gas, bloating, and heartburn. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other possible side effects that may occur with flaxseed products. Flaxseed side affects is a common misspelling of flaxseed side effects.
  • Flaxseed Side Effects
    Potential flaxseed side effects include indigestion or heartburn, gas, and nausea. As this eMedTV resource explains, starting flaxseed at a low dose and increasing it slowly may help prevent these digestive side effects.
  • Flexeed
    Flaxseed is a great source of fiber and alpha-linolenic acid (an omega-3 fatty acid). This eMedTV segment describes the benefits of flaxseed, explains how it is taken, and lists its potential side effects. Flexeed is a common misspelling of flaxseed.
  • Flexseed
    Flaxseed is a natural product that may be effective in lowering cholesterol and relieving constipation. This eMedTV page lists other possible benefits of flaxseed and explains how the product is consumed. Flexseed is a common misspelling of flaxseed.
  • Fluvastatin Extended-Release
    Fluvastatin extended-release is a drug used to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV Web page provides a detailed overview of this statin drug, with information on its effects, dosing, possible side effects, and other uses.
  • Foods High in Cholesterol
    Meat, eggs, butter, cheese, and whole milk are examples of foods high in cholesterol. This portion of the eMedTV archives provides other examples of such foods, as well as those containing saturated fat and trans fat, some of which are plant-based.
  • Foods High in Cholestorol
    Foods high in cholesterol typically come from animals; however, as this eMedTV resource explains, a few plant-based foods can affect cholesterol levels as well. Foods high in cholestorol is a common misspelling of foods high in cholesterol.
  • Foods That Lower Cholesterol
    Foods containing plant sterols, plant stanols, or soluble fiber help decrease cholesterol. This eMedTV page provides lists of foods that lower cholesterol, such as lentils and oatmeal. Foods with soy protein don't have any true effect on cholesterol.
  • Foods That Raise HDL
    While scientists have not yet found foods that raise HDL levels consistently, as this eMedTV segment explains, there are foods that are proven to lower LDL cholesterol and decrease the risk for heart disease, such as walnuts, garlic, and fatty fish.
  • Foods the Help With High Chlosterol
    Beans and other foods high in soluble fiber can help reduce cholesterol. This eMedTV segment provides an overview of the low cholesterol diet. Foods the help with high chlosterol is a common misspelling and variation of foods that lower cholesterol.
  • Foods to Avoid for High Cholesterol
    You may want to avoid organ meats, butter, and egg yolks if you have high cholesterol. This page of the eMedTV Web site lists additional foods to avoid, including not only high cholesterol foods, but also those containing saturated fat and trans fat.
  • Foods to Avoid High Triglicerides
    Fish and fish oil are encouraged as part of a diet to lower triglycerides. This eMedTV resource describes a standard triglyceride-lowering diet. Foods to avoid high triglicerides is a common variation and misspelling of diet to lower triglycerides.
  • Foods to Increase HDL
    At this point, researchers have not yet found HDL-increasing foods; however, as this segment of the eMedTV Web site explains, there are foods that can lower LDL cholesterol. This page also offers a list of foods that can improve heart health.
  • Foods to Lower Triglcerides
    This eMedTV page explains that reducing your alcohol intake and eating more fish can help lower triglycerides. This page also offers a link to more information. Foods to lower triglcerides is a common misspelling of foods to lower triglycerides.
  • Foods to Lower Triglicerites
    To reduce triglycerides, it's important to limit the cholesterol in your diet. This eMedTV page lists other components of a triglyceride-lowering diet. Foods to lower triglicerites is a common variation and misspelling of diet to lower triglycerides.
  • Generic Advicor
    As this eMedTV page explains, there is no generic form of Advicor at this time. This article talks about when to expect a generic version and explains why combining generic lovastatin and non-prescription niacin is not the same as generic Advicor.
  • Generic Altoprev
    Altoprev (lovastatin extended-release) is currently not available in generic form. As this eMedTV page explains, the earliest predictable date that a generic version of Altoprev could become available is December 2017, when the drug's patent expires.
  • Generic Antara
    Can you buy Antara (fenofibrate) in generic form? This selection from the eMedTV tells you what you need to know about the generic availability of Antara, including details on what is meant by the term "authorized generic."
  • Generic Caduet
    As this eMedTV page explains, Caduet (amlodipine and atorvastatin) is now available in both brand-name and generic form. This article takes a closer look at this topic, with details on how the generic versions compare to brand-name Caduet.
  • Generic Cholestyramine
    This page of the eMedTV Web site describes the two generic cholestyramine medicines that are currently on the market. Cholestyramine powder and Cholestyramine Light powder are available in regular powder form as well as single packets.
  • Generic Crestor
    Crestor is currently not available in generic form. As this segment from the eMedTV library explains, the earliest possible date that any generic Crestor products could become available is January 2016, when the first patent for the drug expires.
  • Generic Juvisync
    There are no generic Juvisync (sitagliptin/simvastatin) products available at this time. This eMedTV resource discusses when a generic version might be manufactured and explains whether it is cheaper to take the two components of Juvisync separately.
  • Generic Lescol
    This eMedTV article explains that generic Lescol is currently available. It explains how this products compares to brand-name Lescol and how the FDA rates the equivalency of generic drugs.
  • Generic Lipitor
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic Lipitor (atorvastatin) is now available. This Web resource takes an in-depth look at this topic, with details on the available strengths of the generics and how they compare to brand-name Lipitor.
  • Generic Lipofen
    Lipofen is not available in generic form at this time. As this article from the eMedTV archives explains, the earliest predictable date that any generic Lipofen product could become available is January 2015, when the drug's first patent expires.
  • Generic Livalo
    As this eMedTV page explains, there are currently no generic Livalo (pitavastatin) products. This article discusses when a generic version might become available and describes the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Lopid
    This section of the eMedTV library offers an overview of generic Lopid, which is available through several companies as Gemfibrozil tablets 600 mg. The article also lists the main uses of Lopid and the companies that manufacture generic Lopid.
  • Generic Lovaza
    If you have questions about generic Lovaza, check out this eMedTV article. This selection tells you what you need to know about the generic version, including how it compares to brand-name Lovaza and nonprescription fish oil supplements.
  • Generic Niacin
    Some, but not all, niacin products are currently available in generic form. This segment from the eMedTV Web site describes which generic niacin products are available and explains why there are no generic versions of niacin dietary supplements.
  • Generic Niaspan
    Three different strengths of generic Niaspan (niacin extended-release) are available on the market. This eMedTV Web page lists these various strengths and explains how they compare to brand-name Niaspan.
  • Generic Pravachol
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web site explains, generic Pravachol is currently available. This article offers a detailed description of the generic versions of this drug, including strengths and manufacturers.
  • Generic Prevalite
    There are two forms of generic Prevalite available: Cholestyramine powder and Cholestyramine Light powder. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at these generic forms of the drug and the various strengths available.
  • Generic Simcor
    There are currently no generic versions of Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin) licensed for sale. This eMedTV page explains why there are no generic Simcor products on the market and explores when these products may become available.
  • Generic Statins
    A variety of generic statins is currently available. This page from the eMedTV Web site lists the generic versions of statin medications that are available and explains why some insurance companies may require you to try a generic version first.
  • Generic Tricor
    As this part of the eMedTV site explains, there are now generic versions of Tricor (fenofibrate). This article explains how the generic versions compare to the brand-name drug and lists a few of the manufacturers.
  • Generic Trilipix
    As this eMedTV page explains, generic Trilipix (fenofibric acid delayed-release) is available. This article lists the strengths in which the generic version is sold, explains the FDA's generic drug rating system, and offers details on the manufacturers.
  • Generic Vascepa
    You cannot buy a generic Vascepa (icosapent ethyl) at this time. This eMedTV article contains an explanation of when a generic version of this drug might be introduced and describes why over-the-counter fish supplements are not equivalent to Vascepa.
  • Generic Vytorin
    At this time, generic Vytorin (ezetimibe/simvastatin) is not available. This eMedTV resource explains when a generic version of the drug may be introduced, and also explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic WelChol
    A generic WelChol will not be available until after the drug's patent expires in 2014. However, as this eMedTV Web article warns, online companies advertise generic versions of WelChol that are substandard and dangerous. Don't be fooled.
  • Generic Zetia
    As this eMedTV page explains, a generic Zetia drug will not be available for several years. However, this article lists some other classes of cholesterol drugs that are also effective at lowering cholesterol, such as fibrates.
  • Generic Zocor
    A generic version of Zocor is available in several strengths and is sold under the name Simvastatin tablets. This eMedTV page lists some specific strengths of the generic medication and the companies that manufacture it.
  • Go Nuts for Nuts
    Actually, don't really go nuts. Moderation and portion control are key here, as nuts are high in calories. If you're on a sodium-restricted diet, be sure to choose an unsalted variety, too. While the merits of individual nuts can be debated, we like using a variety of different nuts to provide a variety of different tastes, textures, and nutritional profiles.
  • Good Cholesterol
    The term "good cholesterol" refers to high-density lipoprotein (HDL). This eMedTV resource provides an overview of good and bad cholesterol and explains how improving your HDL levels can lower your risk of heart disease.
  • Good Cholesterol Levels
    Despite popular belief, just having a healthy total cholesterol is not enough to ensure good health. This eMedTV resource explains why good cholesterol levels for HDL and LDL are actually more important than total cholesterol levels.
  • Good Cholestoral
    This eMedTV Web article offers a brief overview of HDL, a type of "good" cholesterol that the body needs to function properly. This page also explains how HDL works in the body. Good cholestoral is a common misspelling of good cholesterol.
  • Good Cholestrol
    HDL, or "good" cholesterol, helps remove excess "bad" cholesterol from the blood. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief description of HDL and explains what are considered normal HDL levels. Good cholestrol is a common misspelling of good cholesterol.
  • Good Foods to Lower Trygliceride Levels
    Fish and fish oil supplements can help lower triglyceride levels. This eMedTV page explains how to create a diet to lower triglycerides. Good foods to lower trygliceride levels is a common variation and misspelling of diet to lower triglycerides.
  • Grapefruit and Advicor
    Some types of statins do not mix well with grapefruit, and Advicor is one of those medicines. This page of the eMedTV archives describes how the two products interact with each other and lists the potential complications that may occur.
  • Grapefruit and Pravachol
    People taking Pravachol don't need to avoid grapefruit products. As this eMedTV page explains, grapefruit and Pravachol don't appear to significantly interact with one another. This page also covers grapefruit's effects on some of the other statins.
  • Grapefruit Juice and Vytorin
    When grapefruit juice and Vytorin are combined, a negative reaction occurs. As this eMedTV resource explains, even one glass of grapefruit juice a day can significantly increase the levels of simvastatin (a component of Vytorin) in the blood.
  • Grapefruit Juice and Zocor
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, grapefruit juice and Zocor can interact with each other to raise the levels of Zocor in the blood and increase the risk of developing a serious, potentially life-threatening muscle problem.
  • HDL
    Your body needs HDL (a type of cholesterol) to function properly. This page of the eMedTV archives provides a detailed look at this type of cholesterol, including what it does, what the numbers mean, and how you can increase it in your system.
  • HDL Cholesterol
    Many people refer to HDL as "good" cholesterol," but why? This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of what HDL does in the body and what you can do to increase your levels. A link to more detailed information is also provided.
  • HDL Cholestrol
    This eMedTV Web segment explains that the body needs HDL cholesterol to function properly. This page also describes how HDL cholesterol works to remove "bad" cholesterol from the blood. HDL cholestrol is a common misspelling of HDL cholesterol.
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