Cholesterol Articles A-Z

Cholesterol/HDL Ratio - Colestid Medication

This page contains links to eMedTV Cholesterol Articles containing information on subjects from Cholesterol/HDL Ratio to Colestid Medication. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Cholesterol/HDL Ratio
    Ideally, the total cholesterol/HDL ratio should be under 3.5 to 1. This eMedTV segment explains how this particular ratio is calculated and explores the controversy regarding using cholesterol ratios to assess a person's risk for heart disease.
  • Cholesterole
    Cholesterol consists of two main types, HDL ("good cholesterol") and LDL ("bad cholesterol"). This eMedTV page describes the different types of cholesterol and offers a link to more information. Cholesterole is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestol
    This eMedTV Web article explains how cholesterol is necessary for the human body to function properly. This page also describes how to determine your cholesterol levels and how often to check them. Cholestol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestoral
    This eMedTV Web resource discusses the various types of cholesterol that the body needs to function properly. This page also explains how too much cholesterol in your blood can cause problems. Cholestoral is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestoral Diet
    A low cholesterol diet should focus on eating more plant-based foods. This eMedTV page lists other aspects to focus on when following a low cholesterol diet. Cholestoral diet is a common variation and misspelling of low cholesterol diet.
  • Cholestoral Levels
    There are different cholesterol levels, including total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol. This eMedTV page describes the differences between these cholesterol levels. Cholestoral levels is a common misspelling of cholesterol levels.
  • Cholestorel
    This eMedTV page explains that the body needs a certain amount of cholesterol to function properly. This page also covers how the body uses cholesterol and how to determine your cholesterol level. Cholestorel is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestorol
    While your body needs cholesterol to function properly, too much can cause problems. This eMedTV resource provides a brief look at this important substance and a link to more information. Cholestorol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestorol Drugs
    Many cholesterol drugs are available, including statins, fibrates, and nicotinic aid. This eMedTV article lists other cholesterol drugs and explores the benefits of combining medicines. Cholestorol drugs is a common misspelling of cholesterol drugs.
  • Cholestorol Levels
    When measuring a person's cholesterol levels, all types of cholesterol are considered. This eMedTV page lists the types of cholesterol and explains how the numbers can be misleading. Cholestorol levels is a common misspelling of cholesterol levels.
  • Cholestral
    As this eMedTV page explains, cholesterol is needed in the body for several reasons, such as holding the cells together and making vitamin D. This page also offers a link to more information. Cholestral is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestral Diet
    Plant-based products are the cornerstone of a low cholesterol diet. This eMedTV selection offers several guidelines on how to eat while reducing your cholesterol. Cholestral diet is a common misspelling and variation of low cholesterol diet.
  • Cholestral Free Foods
    Foods that contain no cholesterol include vegetables, legumes, and fruits. This eMedTV selection gives an overview of foods that are part of a low cholesterol diet. Cholestral free foods is a common misspelling of cholesterol free foods.
  • Cholestral Levels
    A healthy total cholesterol level is one that is under 200 mg/dL. This part of the eMedTV Web site discusses the different types of cholesterol levels that can be measured. Cholestral levels is a common misspelling of cholesterol levels.
  • Cholestral Lowering Foods
    This page on the eMedTV site describes the low cholesterol diet, which emphasizes eating more vegetables and reducing consumption of animal products. Cholestral lowering foods is a common misspelling and variation of cholesterol lowering diet.
  • Cholestral Medicine
    There are many types of cholesterol medicine, including statins and fibrates. This eMedTV Web page lists the factors your doctor will consider before prescribing a cholesterol drug. Cholestral medicine is a common misspelling of cholesterol medicine.
  • Cholestramine
    Cholestyramine is licensed to treat high cholesterol and itching caused by a partial biliary obstruction. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and describes the effects of the medicine. Cholestramine is a common misspelling of cholestyramine.
  • Cholestreol
    Your body uses a substance called cholesterol to hold cells together. This eMedTV page describes other effects of cholesterol, explains where it comes from, and explores the risk of high cholesterol. Cholestreol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestrerol
    Your body needs cholesterol to function properly, but too much cholesterol can cause problems. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of cholesterol and explains where it comes from. Cholestrerol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestrial
    Cholesterol is not only found in foods; it is also a substance made by the body. This eMedTV resource further discusses what cholesterol is used for and explains how it moves through the bloodstream. Cholestrial is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestrol
    Your body needs cholesterol to help make hormones and vitamin D. This eMedTV segment further explains what cholesterol is used for, explains where it comes from, and lists ideal cholesterol levels. Cholestrol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestrol Diet
    A low cholesterol diet should consist of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. This eMedTV Web page describes the goals of maintaining a healthy, low cholesterol diet. Cholestrol diet is a common misspelling and variation of low cholesterol diet.
  • Cholestrol Levels
    An ideal total cholesterol level should be under 200 mg/dL. This eMedTV page describes the other different kinds of cholesterol levels and explains what is healthy and what is unhealthy. Cholestrol levels is a common misspelling of cholesterol levels.
  • Cholestrole
    Cholesterol is a substance found in your body that holds cells together. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of this substance and explains how cholesterol is moved through the bloodstream. Cholestrole is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholestryamine
    Cholestyramine is used for treating high cholesterol and itching caused by a partial biliary obstruction. This eMedTV page further explores cholestyramine uses and explains how the drug works. Cholestryamine is a common misspelling of cholestyramine.
  • Cholestyram
    Cholestyramine is a prescription drug used to treat high cholesterol. This eMedTV Web page discusses other cholestyramine uses, explains how the drug works, and lists side effects that may occur. Cholestyram is a common misspelling of cholestyramine.
  • Cholestyramine
    Cholestyramine is a cholesterol medicine that is also used to treat itching caused by biliary obstruction. This eMedTV segment offers a more in-depth look at the drug, including its uses, potential side effects, and expected results.
  • Cholestyramine Alternatives
    Cholestyramine alternatives may include other bile acid sequestrants or cholesterol medicines. This eMedTV article contains a list of other Cholestyramine substitutes, including cholesterol absorption inhibitors, statins, niacin, and fibrates.
  • Cholestyramine and Pregnancy
    As this section of the eMedTV library explains, Cholestyramine and pregnancy have not been studied in humans. In pregnant animal studies, however, the medicine was found to potentially cause harm to the fetus.
  • Cholestyramine Medicine
    This eMedTV page presents a basic overview of cholestyramine, a medicine often used to treat high cholesterol and manage a symptom of liver disease. This page explains how the drug works, offers a quick dosing tip, and explains what to tell your doctor.
  • Cholosterol
    Cholesterol comes from animal food products and is also made in your body. This article from the eMedTV site explains the importance of cholesterol and briefly describes LDL and HDL cholesterol. Cholosterol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholostrol
    Your body needs some cholesterol in order to function properly. This eMedTV Web page explains what cholesterol does, describes where it comes from, and discusses the risks of high cholesterol. Cholostrol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Cholsterol
    Cholesterol, a substance made by your body, is also found in animal food products. This eMedTV page explains the function of cholesterol and describes the difference between LDL and HDL cholesterol. Cholsterol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Choose Fish
    Fish are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which help to reduce bad cholesterol. You'll get even more bang for your buck by using fish instead of red meat. Don't like fish? Don't despair. While it's probably best to actually eat the fish, fish oil supplements may suffice as a reasonable alternative for people who hate (or are allergic to) fish.
  • Choose Whole Grains
    Confused about whole grains versus whole wheat? Without even reading labels, a safe bet is to choose foods where you can see the whole grain. Think barley soup, oatmeal (as previously discussed), or bread with whole grains baked right in.
  • Christor
    Crestor is used to treat high cholesterol and other conditions related to heart disease. This eMedTV page discusses Crestor uses in more detail and explains what to tell your doctor before taking the drug. Christor is a common misspelling of Crestor.
  • Cinnamon and Cholesterol
    This eMedTV article explores the possible link between cinnamon and cholesterol. There have not yet been enough studies to determine if this spice actually lowers cholesterol; the studies that have been published show conflicting results.
  • In-depth Information on Cinnamon Treatment for Cholesterol
    Adequate studies on using cinnamon to lower cholesterol levels have yet to be conducted. This page of the eMedTV library provides an overview of two studies that have looked at the possible benefits of using cinnamon treatment for cholesterol problems.
  • Colesteral
    This eMedTV Web page explains that cholesterol is found throughout the body and is needed in order for the body to work properly. This page also discusses a common test to check cholesterol levels. Colesteral is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Colesterol
    Cholesterol helps hold cells together, make hormones and vitamin D, and aid in food digestion. This eMedTV resource briefly explains the risk too much cholesterol presents and how it is measured. Colesterol is a common misspelling of cholesterol.
  • Colesterol Average
    When measuring cholesterol, average numbers are a good indication of overall health. However, as this eMedTV page explains, this can be affected by certain factors. Colesterol average is a common misspelling and variation of cholesterol numbers.
  • Colesterol Diet
    This eMedTV page briefly outlines the guidelines for a low cholesterol diet. Such a diet includes lots of vegetables and whole grains and few animal-based products. Colesterol diet is a common misspelling and variation of low cholesterol diet.
  • Colesterol Levels
    This eMedTV article provides information about the different types of cholesterol levels (including HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol) and how to interpret your cholesterol levels. Colesterol levels is a common misspelling of cholesterol levels.
  • Colestid
    Colestid is a brand-name medicine that is commonly prescribed for treating high cholesterol. This page of the eMedTV library offers a more in-depth look at how the drug works and also discusses potential side effects and dosing information.
  • Colestid Alternatives
    This eMedTV resource provides a list of Colestid alternatives, which include other cholesterol drugs, such as niacin, fibrates, or statins. Other bile acid sequestrants are also available, including colesevelam and cholestyramine.
  • Colestid Dosage
    The suggested Colestid dosage is 2 to 16 grams (tablets) or 5 to 30 grams (granules) per day. This segment of the eMedTV archives contains precautions and tips for Colestid dosing and explains when a doctor may choose to alter your drug dosage.
  • Colestid Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV segment provides a list of medicines, such as tetracycline, furosemide, and gemfibrozil, that may interact negatively with Colestid. Drug interactions may cause the medicines to bind in the intestines and not fully absorb into the body.
  • Colestid Medication
    This eMedTV segment presents a brief overview of Colestid, a medication used to lower cholesterol levels in the body. This Web page describes how this drug works, its available forms, and important safety precautions to be aware of.
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