Cholesterol Articles A-Z

Reducing Triglicerides - Tricor 48 mg Tablets

This page contains links to eMedTV Cholesterol Articles containing information on subjects from Reducing Triglicerides to Tricor 48 mg Tablets. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Reducing Triglicerides
    When lowering triglycerides, lifestyle changes are key. This eMedTV page lists factors your doctor will consider when starting treatment for high triglycerides. Reducing triglicerides is a common variation and misspelling of lowering triglycerides.
  • Reducing Tryglycerides
    This eMedTV page features an overview of how to lower your triglycerides, such as with lifestyle changes and certain medicines. This page also offers a link to more information. Reducing tryglycerides is a common misspelling of reducing triglycerides.
  • Risks of Red Yeast Rice
    Red yeast rice may increase liver enzymes and can severely break down muscle tissue. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at other risks of red yeast rice and explains why the FDA considers this supplement to be an "unapproved drug."
  • Side Effects of Cholestyramine
    Common side effects of Cholestyramine may include indigestion, burping, and loss of appetite. This eMedTV page contains a list of other possible problems, including rare but possible side effects, such as asthma, joint pain, or weight gain.
  • Side Effects of Fenofibrate
    Common fenofibrate side effects include nausea, back pain, and body weakness. This eMedTV resource lists other potential side effects, including serious but rare problems such as allergic reactions, infections, and pancreatitis.
  • Side Effects of Lipitor
    As this eMedTV segment explains, any drug has the potential for side effects; Lipitor is no exception. This Web page contains lists of common and serious reactions to this drug, with a link to more detailed information on this topic.
  • Side Effects of Policosanol
    This eMedTV article explores possible side effects of policosanol, including dizziness, upset stomach, and weight loss. This page also discusses more serious side effects, such as signs of internal bleeding and allergic reactions to the supplement.
  • Signs and Symptoms of High Cholesterol
    Because there are no noticeable high cholesterol signs and symptoms, you must have your cholesterol tested. This eMedTV Web page describes how the condition can cause health problems, without any obvious symptoms until it becomes life-threatening.
  • Simcor
    Simcor is a prescription medicine commonly used for treating unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This eMedTV article describes how the drug works, explains when and how to take it, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Simcor 1000/20 mg Tablets
    You should not take more than two Simcor 1000/20 tablets per day. As this eMedTV page explains, the usual starting Simcor dose is 500/20 mg daily. Your doctor may gradually increase your dosage as needed (no faster than by 500 mg every four weeks).
  • Simcor 500/20 mg Tablets
    Most people with high cholesterol typically start with Simcor 500/20 mg tablets (one tablet, once a day). This eMedTV Web page explains what other strengths are available and offers more detailed Simcor dosing guidelines.
  • Simcor 750/20 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, your healthcare provider may recommend Simcor 750/20 mg tablets if your cholesterol does not improve with the lower strength. This article contains detailed dosing guidelines for Simcor.
  • Simcor Alternatives
    There are many alternatives to Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin) for lowering cholesterol. As this eMedTV page explains, alternatives may include fibrates, bile acid sequestrants, cholesterol absorption inhibitors, and other statins.
  • Simcor and Breastfeeding
    It is not known whether Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin) is safe for use during breastfeeding. This eMedTV article offers a more in-depth look at Simcor and breastfeeding, and explores some of the risks of using this drug while nursing.
  • Simcor and Grapefruit
    Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin) is believed to interact with grapefruit products. This eMedTV article describes the interaction that may occur if Simcor and grapefruit are combined (including life-threatening problems that may occur).
  • Simcor and Liver Problems
    It is possible to develop liver problems while taking Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin). This eMedTV Web page offers more information on this drug and liver problems, and explains what tests can be used to detect early liver damage.
  • Simcor and Muscle Pain
    Muscle pain is a possible but uncommon side effect of Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin). As this eMedTV page explains, if muscle pain occurs with a fever while taking Simcor, it is important that you seek medical attention immediately.
  • Simcor and Pregnancy
    You should not use Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin) if you are pregnant. This eMedTV Web page provides more information on pregnancy and Simcor, and describes the problems that may occur if this drug is used during pregnancy.
  • Simcor Dosage
    The recommended starting Simcor dosage for most people with high cholesterol is 500/20 mg once a day. This eMedTV resource offers more detailed dosing guidelines and includes important tips and precautions for using this medication.
  • Simcor Drug Interactions
    Fibrates, cyclosporine, and warfarin are a few of the drugs that may interfere with Simcor. This eMedTV segment lists other drugs that may interact with Simcor and describes the potentially serious problems that may occur with these interactions.
  • Simcor Medication Information
    As this eMedTV article explains, adults with high cholesterol may benefit from Simcor, a prescription drug that contains two active ingredients. This resource gives an overview of Simcor, with information on how the medication works and dosing guidelines.
  • Simcor Medicine for High Cholesterol
    Doctors often prescribe the medicine Simcor for high cholesterol or high triglycerides. This section of the eMedTV archives describes the specific effects of Simcor and explains how the drug works to lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels.
  • Simcor Oral
    Simcor is a prescription drug used to treat unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels. As this eMedTV page explains, it contains two different cholesterol-lowering drugs: extended-release niacin and simvastatin. Simcor comes in oral tablet form.
  • Simcor Overdose
    As with any drug, it is possible to overdose on Simcor (niacin extended-release/simvastatin). This eMedTV resource includes a list of symptoms that may occur with an overdose and describes the various treatment options that are available.
  • Simcor Problems
    Simcor could cause rhabdomyolysis (the severe breakdown of muscles) and other serious muscle problems. This eMedTV article explores other potential Simcor problems and lists some of the side effects that have been reported with this drug.
  • Simcor Risks
    Simcor may cause flushing, which is a sudden reddening and warmth of the face, neck, and/or upper chest. This eMedTV resource covers other potential Simcor risks and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before starting this medication.
  • Simcor Side Affects
    Common Simcor side effects may include back pain, itching, and headache. This eMedTV article also lists potentially serious side effects that require medical attention. Simcor side affects is a common misspelling of Simcor side effects.
  • Simcor Side Effects
    Common side effects of Simcor may include back pain, diarrhea, and flushing. This page from the eMedTV archives provides a more detailed list of possible side effects, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Simcor Substitute
    If you do not respond well to Simcor, alternatives to the drug are available. As this eMedTV page explains, many drugs can be used as a Simcor substitute, including fibrates, cholesterol absorption inhibitors, bile acid sequestrants, or other statins.
  • Simcor Tablets
    Simcor is a drug often used for reducing high cholesterol and triglycerides. As this eMedTV resource explains, Simcor tablets are taken once daily at bedtime. This article offers more detailed dosing information and explores the effects of this drug.
  • Simcor Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Simcor is used for the treatment of high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This article discusses the uses of this drug in more detail (including possible off-label uses) and explains how the medication works.
  • Simcor Warnings and Precautions
    You should talk to your doctor before taking Simcor if you have diabetes, gout, or any bleeding problems. This eMedTV article contains more Simcor warnings and precautions, and offers important information on who should not use this medication.
  • Simcore
    Simcor is a prescription medicine commonly used for treating high cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV page describes Simcor in more detail, explains how it works, and lists some potential side effects. Simcore is a common misspelling of Simcor.
  • Sincor
    Simcor is a prescription medicine used for lowering triglyceride and cholesterol levels. This eMedTV article describes the effects of Simcor and explains what side effects may occur with this drug. Sincor is a common misspelling of Simcor.
  • Soy Lecithin
    Soy lecithin is a supplement claimed to be useful for treating Alzheimer's disease and other conditions. This eMedTV segment covers other benefits of soy lecithin, explores the effectiveness of this product, and lists its potential side effects.
  • Soy Lecithin Dosage
    There is no standard recommended soy lecithin dosage. As this eMedTV Web page explains, only vague "trial and error" dosing information is available, so it is best to follow the dosage instructions on the label of your particular product.
  • Soy Lecithin Drug Interactions
    It is currently not known if other drugs or supplements interact with soy lecithin. Drug interactions, as this eMedTV segment explains, are possible, though, as no studies have been done to specifically look for drug interactions with this product.
  • Soy Lecithin Safety
    Talk to your doctor before taking soy lecithin if you have any chronic or severe medical condition. This eMedTV article provides other soy lecithin safety warnings and precautions, and offers information on who should not use this supplement.
  • Soy Lecithin Side Effects Review
    Most reported soy lecithin side effects are problems with the digestive system. This article from the eMedTV Web site lists specific side effects of these supplements and also describes possible signs of an allergic reaction.
  • Soy Lecithin Supplements
    Are you looking for information about soy lecithin supplements? This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at these products, with information on why people take them, safety issues to keep in mind, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Start With Oats
    Perhaps the best-known cholesterol-lowering food is the humble oat. Inexpensive, versatile, and delicious, oats can be a powerful arsenal in your anticholesterol diet. A bowl of oatmeal (or an oat-based cereal, like Cheerios) can get your day started in the right direction. You can even incorporate oats into dessert, with oatmeal cookies or other similar tasty treats. The soluble fiber in oats acts like sponges, soaking up the cholesterol before it can be absorbed. As an added bonus, the fiber will help you feel fuller longer.
  • Statens
    As a type of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, statin medications are used to lower cholesterol. This eMedTV Web resource provides a brief overview of statins and describes some of their possible side effects. Statens is a common misspelling of statins.
  • Statin Benefits
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library explains, there are several statin benefits, such as lowering LDL cholesterol, increasing HDL cholesterol, and decreasing triglycerides. This page also explains how these drugs work to prevent heart disease.
  • Statin Dangers
    You may not be able to safely use statins if you have certain medical conditions, such as liver disease. This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at other potential statin dangers to be aware of before starting treatment with these medications.
  • Statin Drug List
    When considering a statin medication, several different types of this medication are available. This eMedTV page offers a statin drug list, including an outline of all of the statins (including combination statins) available in the United States.
  • Statin Drug Simcor
    As a statin drug, Simcor works by blocking the enzyme that controls cholesterol production in the body. As this eMedTV segment explains, Simcor also contains niacin, which works by preventing the liver from removing HDL from the bloodstream.
  • Statin Drugs -- What You Should Know
    A doctor may prescribe statin drugs to help lower cholesterol levels. This page of the eMedTV Web library provides a complete overview of statins, including information on how these drugs work, possible side effects, and some general precautions.
  • Statin Medication Information
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library discusses, statin medications may be prescribed to treat high cholesterol. This article also takes a closer look at how these drugs work, possible side effects, and some general safety precautions.
  • Statin Negative Effects
    Statins may cause nausea, muscle aches, and stomach pain. This selection from the eMedTV Web archives provides an overview of potentially negative effects of statins to be aware of before starting treatment with these medications.
  • Statin Overdose
    As this eMedTV page explains, the effects of a statin overdose are not expected to be serious. However, it is important to seek prompt medical care if you have taken too much. This article offers an overview of what to expect in the case of an overdose.
  • Statin Problems
    Some of the potential problems with statins may include nausea, headaches, and muscle aches. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible problems, including potentially serious side effects that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Statin Risks
    Some of the potential risks with using statins may include muscle aches, constipation, and nausea. This eMedTV Web segment describes other safety concerns, including potentially serious problems you should report to your doctor right away.
  • Statin Side Effects
    For people taking statins, problems may include headaches, nausea, and fatigue. This selection from the eMedTV Web site describes other potential side effects of statin medications, including those that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Statin Toxicity
    This eMedTV page explains that statins may not be the right cholesterol medication for some people, as it may cause side effects or toxicity. Statins, for instance, should be avoided by people who drink alcohol frequently or consume grapefruit products.
  • Statin Warnings and Precautions
    In the case of statins, precautions and warnings for users of these drugs include avoiding grapefruit. This eMedTV resource discusses other safety concerns to be aware of, such as those concerning drinking alcohol when taking the medication.
  • Statins
    Statins are medications used for the treatment of high cholesterol. This eMedTV Web article provides an overview of these medications, including information about how they work, when and how to take them, potential side effects, and more.
  • Statins Adverse Effects
    Some of the potential adverse effects with statins include headaches, nausea, and muscle aches. This eMedTV Web resource provides a brief overview of statin side effects, including potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Statins and Alcohol
    This selection from the eMedTV Web site explains that although combining statins and alcohol may not be a problem when drinking moderate amounts, these medications may not be safe for people who regularly consume large amounts of alcohol.
  • Statins and Breastfeeding
    Women who are breastfeeding are typically advised to avoid taking statin drugs. This eMedTV segment talks about statins and breastfeeding, and stresses the importance of talking to your healthcare provider about this issue.
  • Statins and Grapefruit
    A person may be more likely to develop serious muscle problems when statins and grapefruit are combined. This eMedTV segment provides a more detailed explanation of the dangers of consuming grapefruit products while taking certain statin medications.
  • Statins and Heart Disease
    This eMedTV page explains that studies on statins and heart disease have shown that these medications can prevent problems such as heart attacks, strokes, or similar problems. This article further discusses how statins can prevent heart disease.
  • Statins and Liver Damage
    In those taking statins, liver damage may occur and cause problems such as hepatitis and jaundice. This eMedTV page discusses liver-related side effects associated with taking this drug and explains how doctors monitor liver enzymes to help prevent them.
  • Statins and Muscle Aches
    Muscle aches are one of the more common side effects of statins. Muscle aches, as this eMedTV Web article explains, are generally not serious, but in some rare cases may indicate a serious and possibly even life-threatening problem.
  • Statins and Muscle Pain
    Many side effects can occur with statins, and muscle pain is a relatively common one. This eMedTV Web article discusses this side effect in detail, including information about rare but serious muscle problems associated with statins.
  • Statins and Pregnancy
    Women who are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant should not take statins. This selection of the eMedTV Web site discusses statins and pregnancy in more detail, including the potential risks the medication may present to the unborn child.
  • Statins for Cholesterol
    This eMedTV page explains that when using statins for cholesterol treatment, the medication works by controlling the rate of cholesterol production in the body. This page also describes how statins work to increase HDL levels and lower triglycerides.
  • Staton
    Statins are prescription medicines licensed to treat high cholesterol. This page of the eMedTV Web library explains how these drugs work and describes what to tell your doctor before taking them. Staton is a common misspelling of statins.
  • Stattens
    Statins, prescription drugs used to treat high cholesterol, are a type of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors. This eMedTV page provides a brief overview of these medications and offers general dosing guidelines. Stattens is a common misspelling of statins.
  • Staying on Your High Cholesterol Medication
    This eMedTV article offers tips for staying on your high cholesterol medication, such as asking a friend to remind you. By staying on your high cholesterol medication, you can significantly reduce your risk of heart disease or heart attack.
  • Stress and High Cholesterol
    Several studies on stress and high cholesterol indicate that long-term stress can raise blood cholesterol levels, albeit indirectly. This eMedTV segment explores the relationship between stress and high cholesterol and offers stress management tips.
  • Substitute for Zocor
    Fluvastatin, pravastatin, and lovastatin are among the drugs that can be used as a substitute for Zocor. As this eMedTV page explains, people who experience side effects with Zocor may want to consider one of these alternatives.
  • Substitutes for Statins
    If you have side effects, or if statins are not working for you, several alternatives are available. This eMedTV Web resource provides an overview of several substitutes for statins, such as other cholesterol medications or natural alternatives.
  • Symcor
    Simcor is a combination medicine commonly prescribed to treat high cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV resource describes the effects of Simcor and lists potential side effects of the medication. Symcor is a common misspelling of Simcor.
  • Symptoms of High Cholesterol
    People with elevated cholesterol levels don't often experience symptoms of high cholesterol for years. As this eMedTV page explains, even though there are no noticeable high cholesterol signs and symptoms, the condition can still be life-threatening.
  • Symptoms of Statin Overdose
    As this eMedTV page explains, liver damage, kidney failure, and rhabdomyolysis are some of the more serious symptoms of a statin overdose. This article offers more information on possible overdose symptoms, as well as possible treatment options.
  • Triclycerides
    This eMedTV Web page explains how triglycerides are used by the body to produce energy and build cells. This page also describes the problems that can occur if you have high levels in the blood. Triclycerides is a common misspelling of triglycerides.
  • Tricor
    Tricor is a drug that can help lower triglycerides and cholesterol levels. This eMedTV page provides information about how Tricor works, how to take your dosage, and who manufactures it. This page also lists precautions and side effects with Tricor.
  • Tricor 145 mg
    As this eMedTV page discusses, Tricor 145 mg is the strongest strength available in this medication. This page also covers dosing guidelines for lowering high triglycerides and high cholesterol. A link to more information is also included.
  • Tricor 48 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV article explains, Tricor 48 mg tablets are the lowest strength available in this medication. This page covers general Tricor dosing guidelines for treating high cholesterol and high triglycerides, and offers tips on using this drug.
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