Cholesterol Articles A-Z

Niacin Benefits - Pravachol and Breastfeeding

This page contains links to eMedTV Cholesterol Articles containing information on subjects from Niacin Benefits to Pravachol and Breastfeeding. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Niacin Benefits
    Niacin appears to be very beneficial for improving cholesterol levels. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses other possible niacin benefits and explores the effectiveness of the vitamin for these specific uses.
  • Niacin Dosage
    To prevent side effects, it is recommended to start with a low niacin dosage and increase it slowly. As this eMedTV Web page explains, niacin dosing will vary depending on how you respond to the vitamin and the specific niacin product you are taking.
  • Niacin Drug Interactions
    Statins, aspirin, and warfarin are some of the medications that may cause niacin drug interactions. This eMedTV segment lists other products that may interact with niacin and describes the potentially negative effects of these drug interactions.
  • Niacin Flush
    Niacin is known to cause flushing, especially on the face and trunk. This part of the eMedTV library describes this side effect, known as the niacin flush, in more detail and explains how you can help improve (or even eliminate) this problem.
  • Niacin Overdose
    If you take too much niacin, overdose symptoms may include stomach upset, diarrhea, and flushing. This eMedTV resource explores other possible effects of a niacin overdose and describes various treatment options that are available.
  • More About Niacin Side Effects
    Common niacin side effects include indigestion or heartburn, headaches, and flushing. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other common problems with this medicine and also describes potentially serious adverse effects that require medical attention.
  • Niacin Vitamin Information
    Niacin is commonly used to treat high cholesterol. This eMedTV Web page offers some helpful information about niacin, including details on the vitamin's side effects and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Niacin Warnings and Precautions
    Niacin can increase blood sugar in people with diabetes. This eMedTV segment lists other conditions that can be worsened with the use of niacin. Warnings and precautions on who should not use this vitamin are also included in this article.
  • Niacina
    Niacin is a vitamin primarily used for the treatment of high cholesterol. This eMedTV Web page describes the different forms of niacin currently available and offers general warnings for these products. Niacina is a common misspelling of niacin.
  • Niacine
    Niacin is a vitamin that can be used to help lower "bad" cholesterol and triglycerides. This part of the eMedTV archives explains what else niacin may be used for and describes the effects of this vitamin. Niacine is a common misspelling of niacin.
  • Niasin
    Niacin is a vitamin best known for its ability to improve cholesterol levels. This eMedTV Web page describes the various forms of niacin and explains what to discuss with your doctor before using this product. Niasin is a common misspelling of niacin.
  • Niaspan
    Niaspan is a prescription drug that lowers cholesterol and triglycerides in people who cannot lower their cholesterol through lifestyle changes alone. This eMedTV page covers Niaspan's uses, how it works, and how and when to take it.
  • Niaspan 1000 mg Tablets
    The maximum recommended Niaspan dosage is two Niaspan 1000 mg tablets per day. As this eMedTV segment explains, the usual starting dose is 500 mg daily. After four weeks, your doctor may increase your dose to Niaspan 1000 mg.
  • Niaspan 500 mg Tablets
    Most people who first start Niaspan typically take Niaspan 500 mg tablets, the lowest strength. This eMedTV Web page offers more detailed Niaspan dosing guidelines and explains what side effects may occur if your dosage is increased too quickly.
  • Niaspan 750 mg Tablets
    There are three strengths available for Niaspan--750 mg tablets, 500 mg tablets, and 1000 mg tablets. This eMedTV resource offers general Niaspan dosing guidelines and explains how often your doctor may increase your dosage.
  • Niaspan Alternatives
    Niaspan alternatives discussed in this eMedTV article include fibrates like Lofibra and Tricor, statins like Altoprev and Mevacor, and combination medicines. This article also lists factors that can affect which medication you are prescribed.
  • Niaspan and Insomnia
    This eMedTV article suggests some remedies to try if you're taking Niaspan and insomnia becomes a problem, such as keeping a regular sleep-wake cycle and napping no later than 3 p.m. The article also lists common symptoms of insomnia.
  • Niaspan and Liver Problems
    This eMedTV page addresses numerous precautions and warnings related to Niaspan and liver problems, such as symptoms that may signify liver problems while you're taking Niaspan and pre-existing liver conditions that may preclude taking the drug at all.
  • Niaspan and Muscle Pain
    As this eMedTV article explains, muscle pain is a rare Niaspan side effect. However, if you're taking Niaspan and muscle pain occurs, it could signify a very serious muscle condition. This page lists symptoms to report to your doctor right away.
  • Niaspan and Pregnancy
    Previous animal studies of Niaspan and pregnancy suggest that Niaspan could potentially harm a fetus. As this eMedTV page explains, a pregnant woman may take Niaspan if her doctor believes that its benefits outweigh the possible risk to the fetus.
  • Niaspan and Weight Gain
    This page on the eMedTV Web site lists things you can do if you're taking Niaspan and weight gain occurs, such as getting regular physical activity and eating a diet that features lean meats, nuts, and lots of fruits and vegetables.
  • Niaspan Dosage
    The starting dose of Niaspan is 500 mg every night at bedtime. This eMedTV article lists the maximum recommended Niaspan dosage (2000 mg per day), as well as factors that affect Niaspan dosing (for example, the condition you're being treated for).
  • Niaspan Drug
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Niaspan is approved to treat high cholesterol and other conditions. This Web page takes a closer look at Niaspan, with information on available forms, side effects of the drug, and more.
  • Niaspan Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV page explains, interactions with Niaspan can increase a person's risk of bleeding and cause dizziness and lightheadedness, among other things. This page lists drugs that can react with Niaspan, such as warfarin, aspirin, and Calan.
  • Niaspan Precautions and Warnings
    Some conditions to tell your doctor about before taking Niaspan include diabetes, gout, and liver failure. This eMedTV page also discusses the safety of pregnancy and breastfeeding while taking Niaspan, among other Niaspan precautions and warnings.
  • Niaspan Side Effects
    As this eMedTV segment explains, flushing of the face and neck occurs in up to 88 percent of people who take Niaspan. This page also covers side effects of Niaspan like headache, diarrhea, and stomach pain, and gives statistics on how often they occur.
  • Niaspan Uses
    This eMedTV page covers Niaspan uses, such as lowering cholesterol and triglycerides and reducing the chance of another heart attack in people with a history of a heart attack and high cholesterol. This page also covers how Niaspan works in the body.
  • Niassan
    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is often used for improving cholesterol levels. This eMedTV segment describes the effects of this vitamin and explains what niacin products are currently available. Niassan is a common misspelling of niacin.
  • Niesen
    Niacin is a vitamin most often used for treating high cholesterol. This page from the eMedTV library explains what forms niacin comes in and describes how this product works to improve cholesterol levels. Niesen is a common misspelling of niacin.
  • Niezen
    Niacin is a "B" vitamin often used for controlling high cholesterol. This eMedTV page describes the effects of this vitamin, lists its potential side effects, and explains what niacin products are available. Niezen is a common misspelling of niacin.
  • Niocin
    Niacin is a vitamin most commonly used for treating high cholesterol. This eMedTV resource describes the various niacin products currently available and lists potential side effects of these products. Niocin is a common misspelling of niacin.
  • Nispan
    Niaspan is a prescription medicine approved to lower cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV article explains how Niaspan works and lists conditions to tell your doctor about before using this drug. Nispan is a common misspelling of Niaspan.
  • Nispen
    Niaspan is a medicine that can be prescribed to treat high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV page describes the effects of Niaspan and lists possible side effects that may occur with treatment. Nispen is a common misspelling of Niaspan.
  • Normal Cholesteral Level
    Normal cholesterol levels can vary from person to person. However, as this eMedTV segment explains, most people are encouraged to have a total cholesterol of under 200. Normal cholesteral level is a common misspelling of normal cholesterol levels.
  • Normal Cholesterol Levels
    While it can vary, for most people, normal cholesterol levels include a total cholesterol under 200 mg/dL. This eMedTV Web page also explains ideal levels for HDL and LDL, and includes information about triglycerides.
  • Normal Cholestral Levels
    Total cholesterol levels under 200 mg/dL are ideal. This eMedTV Web page explains what is considered an unhealthy total cholesterol, HDL, and LDL level. Normal cholestral levels is a common variation and misspelling of cholesterol levels.
  • OTC Niacin Vs. Niaspan
    Many people may be confused about the difference between OTC niacin versus Niaspan (the prescription drug). This eMedTV page explores some of the differences and explains whether these two products are considered to be equivalent.
  • Phenofibrate
    Fenofibrate is a prescription drug that can help lower cholesterol and triglycerides. This eMedTV page provides a brief overview of the drug, including how it is taken and possible side effects. Phenofibrate is a common misspelling of fenofibrate.
  • Plaque
    Known as atherosclerosis, plaque buildup in the arteries can lead to various forms of heart disease. This eMedTV Web page explains how this buildup is formed and outlines its role in causing problems like angina and heart attacks.
  • Policosanal
    The supplement policosanol is claimed to be useful for reducing cholesterol. This eMedTV resource explains where policosanol comes from and explores how it may work for treating high cholesterol. Policosanal is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Policosanol
    Policosanol is a type of herbal supplement that is claimed to help lower cholesterol. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of policosanol, including information on how this herbal supplement may work, possible side effects, and safety concerns.
  • Policosanol and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe for breastfeeding women to use policosanol. This eMedTV page explains that no studies have been done on policosanol and breastfeeding, so it is not known if the supplement passes through breast milk or if it would cause problems.
  • Policosanol and Pregnancy
    It is not known if policosanol is safe for use during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource explains that there has not been enough research on policosanol and pregnancy, so it is probably a good idea for pregnant women to avoid this herbal supplement.
  • Policosanol Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that there are no established policosanol dosing guidelines, but some studies used a dosage of 5 mg to 10 mg twice daily for treating high cholesterol. This page also offers important tips on taking your policosanol dosage.
  • Policosanol Drug Interactions
    Policosanol drug interactions may increase your risk of bleeding. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how drug interactions with policosanol may occur if you take this supplement with aspirin, heparin, clopidogrel, or other medications.
  • Policosanol Overdose
    Potentially serious policosanol overdose symptoms may include internal bleeding. This eMedTV segment explores factors that may affect a policosanol overdose and covers the treatment options that are available if you take too much of the supplement.
  • Policosanol Supplements
    This eMedTV segment gives some basic information about policosanol supplements, which are often claimed to treat high cholesterol. This article discusses how they are thought to work, possible side effects, and more.
  • Policosanols
    Policosanol is a supplement claimed to be beneficial for lowering cholesterol. This eMedTV page further explores these claims, explains how policosanol works, and lists its potential side effects. Policosanols is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Policosinal
    Policosanol is believed to have cholesterol-lowering effects. This eMedTV article explains where policosanol comes from, describes how it works, and explores the effectiveness of this supplement. Policosinal is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Policosinol
    Policosanol is a natural product that is claimed to lower cholesterol. This eMedTV page further describes policosanol, including possible side effects and what to tell your doctor before taking it. Policosinol is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Policosonal
    Policosanol is a "natural" product claimed to be useful for lowering cholesterol. This eMedTV segment explores how policosanol may work and lists possible side effects of the supplement. Policosonal is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Policosonol
    Policosanol is claimed to be beneficial for lowering cholesterol. This eMedTV page explains what to talk to your doctor about before using the supplement and lists side effects that may occur. Policosonol is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Polycosanol
    Policosanol is a supplement that can be used to reduce cholesterol. This eMedTV Web page explores the benefits of policosanol, explains how it may work, and lists side effects that may occur. Polycosanol is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Polycosonal
    Policosanol is a dietary supplement often used for treating high cholesterol. This eMedTV page lists conditions to tell your doctor about before using policosanol and explains how the product works. Polycosonal is a common misspelling of policosanol.
  • Pour, Don't Spread
    When cooking (or even when baking, in some situations), choose oils that are liquids at room temperature instead of solid alternatives (lard, shortening, or butter). Olive oil is an excellent choice (although it burns more easily than most other oils), but even inexpensive vegetable oils will provide some benefit.
  • Pravachol
    Pravachol is a drug used to treat conditions such as high cholesterol and high triglycerides. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of this prescription statin drug, including its effects, dosages, potential side effects, and more.
  • Pravachol Alternatives
    As this eMedTV resource explains, there are many other cholesterol medicines in addition to Pravachol. Alternatives include other statins or cholesterol medications. This article explains these substitutes, such as fluvastatin, in detail.
  • Pravachol and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of Pravachol does not recommend taking this drug while breastfeeding. This page from the eMedTV library contains more information on Pravachol and breastfeeding, and explains whether this medicine passes through breast milk.
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